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Safe and Sound- Ending Child Abuse by Raising Awareness - WTLC: Ending the Cycle of Violence and Exploitation
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Safe and Sound- Ending Child Abuse by Raising Awareness

Have you ever found yourself thinking about the ways in which you can make a difference in a child’s life?

 

WTLC continues to equip participants and parents alike with tools to contribute to the prevention of child sexual abuse. We provide a variety of services for children, including housing, homework support, children’s art classes, and counseling. The clinical department works with children ages three and above. Individual and family counseling work to address concerns, often relating to sexual abuse. Child sexual abuse commonly coincides with domestic violence and human trafficking due to its violent aspects.

 

Some common contributing factors to child sexual abuse are: lack of supervision, low socioeconomic status, involvement with Child Protective Services, experiencing or witnessing domestic violence, and having an adult at home who uses substances. When these factors are present, there are some common signs within children to identify sexual abuse. One sign includes changed behavior, specifically isolation or secrecy. Increased language or discussion of sex and genitalia that is otherwise not developmentally appropriate, bleeding or redness in the genital area, and STIs are also signs to be aware of. Children who have survived sexual abuse have a heightened likelihood of experiencing mental health disorders including: depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety, and panic disorder. Additionally, they also are at a higher risk of suicide attempts or death by suicide. The nature of these traumatic events can lead the child to feel the need to be secretive, usually because the events are also occurring in a secretive manner. Child sexual abuse survivors are given priority in our clinical services at WTLC due to the intrusive and often ongoing trauma that a child has endured.

 

To register for services or inquire about additional information, please contact us through our 24/7 Helpline at 877-531-5522 or email: love@wtlc.org